Did You Know? Facts & Figures About the Holiday of Easter

Facts & Figures About the Holiday of Easter

Did you know that religion historians believe that the holiday of Easter originated with the pagan diduknow-easterfestival of Eastre, a Saxon celebration of spring and fertility?

Did you know that thousands of Christian pilgrims converge on Jerusalem every year to celebrate the Holy Week of Easter?

Did you know that Ash Wednesday gets its name from the practice of painting ashes on the forehead as a sign of repentance?

Did you know that in Russia, Easter eggs are dyed on Holy Thursday?

Did you know that in Greece, children and adults alike play an egg cracking game called tsougrisma on Easter?

Did you know that Easter is celebrated on the first Sunday following the full moon of the vernal equinox?

Did you know that the trumpet shape of the Easter Lily is considered symbolic of the heralding of Jesus on his triumphant entry into Jerusalem?

Did you know that 95 percent of the world’s Easter Lilies are produced by just ten growers along the California-Oregon border?

Did you now that Palm Sunday is also known as Passion Sunday in many Orthodox churches?

Did you know that in many Catholic churches, Good Friday services begin at precisely 3 o’clock?

Did you know that Americans eat more candy at Easter than at any other holiday besides Halloween?

Did you know that the most popular Easter confection is Marshmallow Peeps?

Did you know that eating Easter candy is a relatively modern tradition?

Did you know that the most popular treat to hide inside an Easter egg is jellybeans?

Did you know that over one billion Easter eggs are hunted every year in America?

Did you know that ham is the most commonly served meat at Easter dinners in America?

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And Then There’s Homer!

Pope Homer
Pope Homer – Save Me Jebus

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Daylight Saving Time: 5 Things to Know

Today is the Day – Daylight Saving Time
Today is the Day - Daylight Saving Time: 5 Things to Know
Today is the Day – Daylight Saving Time: 5 Things to Know
1. When do I need to change my clocks?
2. What effect does the time change have on my body?
3. Which states have ditched the time change?
4. When was daylight saving time signed into law?
5. Why does it exist?

Celebrate International Women’s Day (IWD)

HOW WILL YOU MARK THE DAY?

Celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievement of women.

Yet let’s also be aware progress has slowed in many places across the world, so urgent action is needed to accelerate gender parity.

Leaders across the world are pledging to take action as champions of gender parity.

http://www.internationalwomensday.com/

Celebrate International Women's Day (IWD)
Celebrate International Women’s Day (IWD)

Happy World Wildlife Day!

Happy World Wildlife Day! The future of wildlife is in our hands. The future of elephants is in our hands. Add your voice, show your support! http://thndr.me/vAXgiJ

Happy World Wildlife Day!
Happy World Wildlife Day!

On 20 December 2013, at its 68th session, the United Nations General Assembly decided to proclaim 3 March, the day of signature of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), as UN World Wildlife Day to celebrate and raise awareness of the world’s wild animals and plants. The UNGA resolution also designates the CITES Secretariat as the facilitator for the global observance of this special day for wildlife on the UN calendar.

World Wildlife Day will be celebrated in 2016 under the theme “The future of wildlife is in our hands.” African and Asian elephants will be a main focus of the Day under the theme “The future of elephants is in our hands”. Countries around the world are encouraged to highlight species of wild animals and plants from their own countries, adapting the global theme to suit.

The world’s wildlife,  whether charismatic or lesser known,  is facing many challenges. The biggest threats to wildlife are habitat loss  as well as overgrazing, farming and development. Poaching and trafficking in wildlife driven by transnational organized crime groups pose the most immediate threat to many iconic species.  Elephants, pangolins, rhinoceros, sharks, tigers and precious tree species are among the most critically poached and trafficked species across the world.